Tri-Ominos


Tri-Ominos is a fun variation on the classic domino game where players earn and lose points based on luck and skill. An excellent choice for family game night.

The Object
Be the first player to score 400 points.

What's in the Box
56 Tri Ominos
Game Instructions

Setting Up the Game
Place all the Tri-Ominos face down on the table.
Select one person to be the scorekeeper.
On a piece of paper create a column for each player. As plays are made the scorekeeper adds or subtracts points for each player in their column.

If playing with 2 players each player takes 9 pieces.
If 3 to 4 players take 7 each
If 5 to 6 players take 6 each

After the pieces have been selected, players stand them up with the numbers facing them and out of sight of the other players.

Playing the Game
The player that has the Tri-Omino with the highest valued three of the same number starts the game. Three 5's would be the highest followed by three 4's and so on. The player that starts the game is awarded the total of the three numbers plus a 10 point bonus for starting.

If three 0's start the game they are awarded 30 points plus the additional 10 point bonus.

If the player that has the starting Tri-Omino and the three 0's one they may choose to play either, but if they choose to play the three 0's they must show the other players that they also have the one with the three highest numbers on it.

If no player has a Tri-Omino with three of the same number, then the player that has the piece with the highest total starts. This player is awarded the total points for the numbers on the piece, but does not receive the 10 point bonus for starting.

Playing clockwise, the next player tries to match any two numbers on the starting Tri-Omino with one of their own. If they are successful the total of the numbers on their Tri-Omino is added to their score.

Picking From the Well
The well is the remaining pieces that are face down.

If a player is unable to match one of their pieces they must pick one from the well. They continue to pull pieces from the well until they find one that matches. For each piece picked from the well, 5 points are deducted from the players score. After the deductions are made the scorekeeper adds the total sum of the points on the played matching Tri-Omino to the players score.

If a player is unable to match any Tri-Ominos in his hand nor from the well they pass their turn. Ten points are deducted from their score and play moves to the next player.

Winning a Round
The first player to successfully play all of their Tri-Ominos wins the round and is awarded a 25 point bonus plus the total points of all the Tri-Ominos left in the other players hands.

If all players have passed their turn and the game is locked,

the player with the least amount of Tri-Ominos is declared the winner for the round. All points from the other players hands are added to the winners score, but they are not awarded any bonus points and they must deduct the total of the Tri-Ominos left in their hand from their score.

Beginning a New Round
To begin a new round turn all the Tri-Ominos face down. Mix them up. Each player then picks their pieces. Each round is played the same as the first.

Winning the Game
The first player to reach 400 points in the winner. If a player reaches 400 points in the middle of a round, play is continued until the round ends. If more than one player reaches 400 points during the round the winner of that round wins the game.

Bonus Scoring
When a player matches all three numbers of one of their Tri-Ominos and forms a hexagon, the sum of the three numbers plus 50 bonus points are awarded to that player.

After a bridge has already been formed and a player matches two sides of a Tri-Omino, they receive the sum of the three numbers and a 40 point bonus.







Tri-Ominos is making a strong comeback and is now available as an iPhone app. The commercial below blends the TV commercial from the 1980's with shots of the new app.







See the iPhone Tri-Ominos app in action in this review. It is a truly addictive game.






Return to Rules and Instructions from Tri-Ominos

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